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Haven't met a line that I didn't like crossing--repeatedly.
  • Otherworldly October Tale #10: “Amerikanski Dead at the Moscow Morgue.” (1999)
Author: Kim Newman, (b.1959)
The Tale: American zombies, the foot soldiers of a new Cold War, surround a morgue in central Moscow.  Why do they merely stand and wait?  What do they want?
Background: Newman has done horror from many different angles, including his acclaimed Anno Dracula series (if you haven’t you should). This story kicks off the award-winning anthology, 999.
  • Otherworldly October Tale #10: “Amerikanski Dead at the Moscow Morgue.” (1999)

    Author: Kim Newman, (b.1959)

    The Tale: American zombies, the foot soldiers of a new Cold War, surround a morgue in central Moscow.  Why do they merely stand and wait?  What do they want?

    Background: Newman has done horror from many different angles, including his acclaimed Anno Dracula series (if you haven’t you should). This story kicks off the award-winning anthology, 999.

  • Otherworldly October Tale #9: “The Fog Horn.” (1951)
Author: Ray Bradbury, (1920-2012)
The Tale: On a cold November night, lighthouse keepers Johnny & McDunn witness the power of the fog horn, as it draws something unspeakably powerful and primordial from the Deeps. 
Background: It’s Bradbury.  Read it.
  • Otherworldly October Tale #9: “The Fog Horn.” (1951)

    Author: Ray Bradbury, (1920-2012)

    The Tale: On a cold November night, lighthouse keepers Johnny & McDunn witness the power of the fog horn, as it draws something unspeakably powerful and primordial from the Deeps. 

    Background: It’s Bradbury.  Read it.

  • Otherworldly October Tale #8: “The Hollow Man.” (1991)
Author: Norman Partridge, (b.1958)
The Tale: An unspeakable evil is at work in the Canadian woods.  Told from the point of view of a wendigo preying on a party of hunters, this is true horror at its best.
Background: Partridge has won three Bram Stoker awards for his horror fiction.  The Hollow Man was included in the volume “American Supernatural Tales,” published by Penguin Classics. 
  • Otherworldly October Tale #8: “The Hollow Man.” (1991)

    Author: Norman Partridge, (b.1958)

    The Tale: An unspeakable evil is at work in the Canadian woods.  Told from the point of view of a wendigo preying on a party of hunters, this is true horror at its best.

    Background: Partridge has won three Bram Stoker awards for his horror fiction.  The Hollow Man was included in the volume “American Supernatural Tales,” published by Penguin Classics. 

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  • Otherworldly October Tale #6: “Demon.” (1996)
Author: Joyce Carol Oates, (b.1926)
The Tale: An extremely short and intense tale where every word matters.  Is the supernatural truly at work here?  You decide.
Background: Oates is one of our most prolific contemporary authors, and no stranger to tales of horror and the supernatural.  Demon is a masterful exercise in using an economy of words, yet still creating a complete sense of place and tone. 
  • Otherworldly October Tale #6: “Demon.” (1996)

    Author: Joyce Carol Oates, (b.1926)

    The Tale: An extremely short and intense tale where every word matters.  Is the supernatural truly at work here?  You decide.

    Background: Oates is one of our most prolific contemporary authors, and no stranger to tales of horror and the supernatural.  Demon is a masterful exercise in using an economy of words, yet still creating a complete sense of place and tone. 

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  • Otherworldly October Tale #5: "Pacific 421." (1944)
Author: August Derleth, (1909-1971)
The Tale: Albert Colley’s Missouri farm is intersected by a train line, and it’s used by a very special (and spectral) train.  When Colley invites his stepfather for a visit, he has a dark use for the train in mind.  Will the ill-fated Pacific 421 aid Colley with his nefarious plot?
Background: Depending on who you ask, Derleth is either the creator of a publishing house that “almost single-handedly defined the development of horror fiction in America,” or someone whose misinterpretation of H.P. Lovecraft’s writings both diminished and demeaned their achievements. He is also known as the author of some of the best Sherlock Holmes pastiches, the Solar Pons mysteries.  Derleth also wrote many horror stories, including Pacific 421, a tale with a twist in the ending.
  • Otherworldly October Tale #5: "Pacific 421." (1944)

    Author: August Derleth, (1909-1971)

    The Tale: Albert Colley’s Missouri farm is intersected by a train line, and it’s used by a very special (and spectral) train.  When Colley invites his stepfather for a visit, he has a dark use for the train in mind.  Will the ill-fated Pacific 421 aid Colley with his nefarious plot?

    Background: Depending on who you ask, Derleth is either the creator of a publishing house that “almost single-handedly defined the development of horror fiction in America,” or someone whose misinterpretation of H.P. Lovecraft’s writings both diminished and demeaned their achievements. He is also known as the author of some of the best Sherlock Holmes pastiches, the Solar Pons mysteries.  Derleth also wrote many horror stories, including Pacific 421, a tale with a twist in the ending.

  • Otherworldly October Tale #4: "The Toll-House." (1907)
Author: W.W. Jacobs, (1863-1943)
The Tale: Three friends conspire to spend an evening in the haunted Toll-House with their skeptical friend Barnes, intent on spooking him.  But when the spirits come out to play, will it be Barnes who pays the house’s toll?  
Background: Jacobs is most famous for his short story “The Monkey’s Paw,” a legendary tale of horror that has been endlessly anthologized, performed, parodied, and imitated.  The Toll-House is another very worthy addition to the tales of that which goes bump in the night.
  • Otherworldly October Tale #4: "The Toll-House." (1907)

    Author: W.W. Jacobs, (1863-1943)

    The Tale: Three friends conspire to spend an evening in the haunted Toll-House with their skeptical friend Barnes, intent on spooking him.  But when the spirits come out to play, will it be Barnes who pays the house’s toll?  

    Background: Jacobs is most famous for his short story “The Monkey’s Paw,” a legendary tale of horror that has been endlessly anthologized, performed, parodied, and imitated.  The Toll-House is another very worthy addition to the tales of that which goes bump in the night.

  • Otherworldly October Tale #3: “How Fear Departed From The Long Gallery.” (1912)

    Author: E.F. Benson (1867-1940)

    The Tale: The Peveril Family is used to hauntings around their ancestral home—after all, they know the ghosts!  But there are two ghosts they dare not speak of, ghosts connected to a terrible incident in the family’s past, who do unspeakable harm to those unfortunate enough to see them. When poor Madge Dalrymple finds herself trapped after dark in the long gallery, will she share the fate of those before her?

    Background: Benson was an extremely talented jack-of-all-trades as a writer, authoring novels, biographies, and other materials on top of his ghostly tales.  If that wasn’t enough to make you envious, he looks like someone straight out of My Daguerrotype Boyfriend (sorry ladies, but he most likely played for the other team).  Benson’s Long Gallery tale is at turns humorous and frightening, a true feat of authorial skill to rival his friend and contemporary, M.R. James.  It was also his personal favorite, and is now one of mine as well.

  • Otherworldly October Tale #2: “Lot 249.” (1892)
Author: Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)
The Tale: An Oxford college student obtains an Egyptian mummy at auction, and uses it to settle old scores.  Can fellow student Abercrombie Smith put a stop to this ancient evil?
Background: Doyle, most well known for his Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger stories, was a practitioner of many different kinds of tales, including those of the creepy and the macabre.  This tale was the first to depict a reanimated mummy as a force of evil.
Image from the 1892 publication of the story in Harper’s Magazine.  
  • Otherworldly October Tale #2: “Lot 249.” (1892)

    Author: Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)

    The Tale: An Oxford college student obtains an Egyptian mummy at auction, and uses it to settle old scores.  Can fellow student Abercrombie Smith put a stop to this ancient evil?

    Background: Doyle, most well known for his Sherlock Holmes and Professor Challenger stories, was a practitioner of many different kinds of tales, including those of the creepy and the macabre.  This tale was the first to depict a reanimated mummy as a force of evil.

    Image from the 1892 publication of the story in Harper’s Magazine.  

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  • 31 Spooky Tales—Anyone Interested?

    Hi Everyone—

    I’m thinking of reading 31 spooky or weird tales for the month of October, and posting my thoughts, reactions, recommendations, etc.  Does that sound interesting to anyone?  Let me know you’re out there!

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  • 
by incidentalcomics:
Ban This Book.


Unrealistic sex AND puns? I’m so in. #BannedBooks
  • by incidentalcomics:

    Ban This Book.

    Unrealistic sex AND puns? I’m so in. #BannedBooks

    (via bookporn)

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